How to read SMDR records

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How to read SMDR records


Article ID: 51881 - Last Review: March 13, 2013

Introduction

The 3300 ICP have two classes of SMDR records: External SMDR (generated when a PBX trunk is involved in the call) and Internal SMDR (generated when there are no trunks involved in the call). Each sub-stream is governed by separate configuration options programmed on the PBX and must be enabled to send data to the Enterprise Server. 


External SMDR records

An External SMDR record is generated by the PBX when

1. A call is completed (i.e. when all parties involved in the call have hung up). This can be either an answered or abandoned call.
2. A call is transferred
3. An Account Code is entered
4. A call is interflowed from the ACD queue to a new destination
5. A call is requeued back to the ACD queue by an agent who did not answer the call
6. A call is Queue Unavailable and routed to another answering point

Example

The following is an example of an External SMDR record:

01/14 09:24 00:00:59 T201 003 P001 100 1011T 1405

Where,
01/14 is the date the caller contacted your contact center
09:24 is the time the call originated
00:00:59 is the amount of time the agent spoke with the caller before transferring the call
T201 is the number of the trunk that the caller dialed in to
003 is the time to answer for the agent (not the time spent in queue)
P001 is the reporting number of the ACD path queue the call was queued to
100 is the reporting number of the agent group
1011 is the ID of the agent who first answered the call
T is the transferred call identifier
1405 is the ID of the agent whom the call was transferred to

This means that an outside caller dialed in to the contact center on Trunk 201, on January 14th at 9:24 AM. The call was queued to the ACD Path Queue 1 (shown as P001), queued to Agent Group 100, and answered by Agent 1011 after 3 seconds waiting in queue. The agent who answered the call talked to the customer for 59 seconds before transferring the call to Agent 1405.

 

Internal SMDR records

An Internal SMDR record is generated by the PBX when

1. A call is completed (i.e. when all parties involved in the call have hung up) between two devices on the PBX (extensions or agents), with no outside parties (trunks) involved in the call
2. The call is an internal answered call only
3. Calls to ACD queues report based on the dialable number of the queue, not the reporting number as found in the External SMDR records.
4. All parties in the call have their Class of Services set to enable SMDR Internal recording
5. The PBX has the Internal SMDR option enabled.



Example

The following is an example of an Internal SMDR record:

01/14 07:20 00:00:10 6979 002 6515 I 7015

Where,
1/14 is the date the call was made
07:20 is the time the call originated
00:00:10 is the length of the call
6979 is the extension that the call was made from
002 is the time to answer for the agent (not the time spent in queue)
6515 is the dialable number of the ACD queue the call was made to
I is the internal call identifier
7015 is the ID of the agent who answered the call

This means that on January 14th at 7:20 AM, internal Extension 6979 dialed the ACD Queue P001 with dialable number 6515. The call was answered by Agent 7015 after 2 seconds of wait time. The two parties talked for 10 seconds. There was no external caller involved in this call.

 

Troubleshooting

An SMDR record will only be sent to the Contact Center Management Enterprise Server in the previously mentioned conditions, when

1. All parties involved in each call segment have their PBX Class of Service set to record SMDR calls (incoming and outgoing)
2. The SMDR Options on the PBX have been set to record incoming, outgoing, and internal calls
3. The SMDR Options have been set to generate new SMDR records for each transferred segment of a call



Keywords:
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Last Modified:Wednesday, March 13, 2013
Last Modified By: amontpetit
Type: INFO
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